Thursday, 8 October 2009

Do you remember this posting of Conductive World?

Last December just a book: now coming on stage
A play for today


'Compelling, controversial and confrontational, it is a brilliant addition to the inclusion or, as some argue, the illusion debate. Philosophical, political, cultural, ethical, yet human and humane in content, it is written with insight into the conflicts, traumas, joy and concerns that are daily events in the life of any school...' (The Teacher, October 2008). Do you have a disabled child? Do you work with disabled childen and their families? Are you looking for a Christmas present that's bit different? Then try this:
Death of a Nightingale
by Alan Share
http://www.deathofanightingale.com/
 
Or at least read and consider the extensive website that includes an extensive download available for preview (including the author's personal testament). The book comes from England where 'educational inclusion' has so far been receiving its severest public drubbing, but you may well find that what is says is relevant to your own situation or experiences, wherever you are. This is a work of fiction, in the form of a play for reading or public performance. The book is privately published and all royalties are being donated to the Death of the Nightingale Fund to help fund holidays for disabled children. The website contains its own Forum but you comments on reading this (book or website) will also be most welcome on this blog.

Now on stage

There will be a professional reading of the play Death of a Nightingale by Alan Share at the New End Theatre, Hampstead at 7.30 p.m. on Sunday 22 and Monday 23 November. This rehearsed reading is directed by Ninon Jerome A discussion on the play will follow the end of both performances. Tickets are only £5.oo per head. To book go to:

To whet your appetite, here is the theatre's own synopsis:
A play ... but it reads like a novel

A PLAY ON WORDS Compelling, controversial and confrontational, it is a brilliant addition to the inclusion or, as some argue, the illusion debate. Philosophical, political, cultural, ethical, yet human and humane in content, it is written with insight into the conflicts, traumas, joy and concerns that are daily events in the life of any school.
Set against the proposal to close a successful special school on the basis of an inclusive educational agenda, major issues are explored and exposed. Characters present a variety of arguments in a thought-provoking presentation of some contentious matters. There are three themes to this play:
  1. Westborough Local Authority attempts to close Brighouse School, a school for physically disabled children with an associated learning difficulty in accordance with a policy of Inclusion with national and international endorsement, but against the wishes of parents, children, staff and governors.
  2. Pressure on the head teacher to support this against her better judgment leading her to attempt suicide. She said that she felt like "a little lump of plasticine in the hands of the LEA."
  3. A music lesson, where music has a special value to children with special needs - can “spirituality” in music reconcile different faiths that believe in a universal creator so that each one can respect the others, while atheists and agnostics can rejoice in the flourishing of the human spirit? This is one of the most important issues of our times.
Bookings

Tickets are only £5.oo per head. To book go to:

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