Wednesday, 22 September 2010

Help me if you can...

Will you, please, please help me * 

In just over seven weeks I shall be in Hong Kong fulfilling one of several pleasant obligations to the Seventh World CE Congress. The one that I find hardest to prepare for is my plenary address on the Congress's opening day. It is not standing up and performing that concerns me. In the event, I anticipate, these plenary sessions will run like clockwork:


My title will be:

Historical, Social and Political Issues of Conductive Education

If you are one of the many who for a host of good reasons will not be attending the Congress I shall be posting the prepared text of this presentation as soon as I have presented it to the plenary session (as soon, that is, as I can get myself to an inexpensive Internet point!).

I hope to broadcast all my own presentations in this way, along with a blow-by-blow account of what I observe in Hong Kong, and what I think about it. I do hope that other presenters take the opportunity to 'broadcast' their presentations in this way, either on the websites of their own organisations or through the facility of Conduction Depository that is soon to be established. (Further information on this means of publication will soon be published: to be informed of further developments, on this and other matters, register your email address at http://www.e-conduction.org/). I also hope that some of the other CE-bloggers attending will also run their own commentaries of events and impressions.

Mixed audience →  mixed media

These plenary sessions in Hong Kong will bring together a very mixed audience, probably with a wider variety of experience, understanding and goals than any previous gathering on Conductive Education. How to deal with this?

In all my prepared presentations to the Congress I shall be trying to do so by offering everybody who sits there and listens to me the chance to have done a little preliminary reading, by courtesy of the Internet. Everyone in the audience will therefore have had opportunity to get up to speed on my topic. You can lead a horse to water, of course, but I can do no more..

As part of this process I shall be updating my paper 'Towards a history of Conductive Education' (2006), which has been on the Internet in its present form since 2006, published as a Google Knol:

I have not managed well with Knol and eventually I have had to admit defeat in trying to get it to obey my formatting instructions. Now, however, Conduction will soon be offering the world of CE (not just myself) a much easier way to post documents. This paper will provide a useful field test for the system:


That paper was published in its present form four years ago. There may be all sorts of details to amend about CE's 'olden days' or, as some like to see them, its 'golden days', but there is also the question of what has happened in the four tumultuous years since 2006, and the need to revisit the hypothesis on which that paper ended, that Conductive Education is entering a new historical crisis.

Help, please

Please do let me know if you have any data, observations, analyses, suggestions  etc., that I might consider in revising this paper:
  • on the specifics of events
  • on the historical periodisation proposed
  • on the question of a historical crisis
  • or indeed on any aspect, big or small
Do remember, a history of CE is not just about András Pető, or even just about what has happened in Hungary! CE's modern history, now sone twenty-odd years in the making, is potentially just and important and interesting for the present and the future. Some of this modern history is still of course happening in Hungary but the big historical trends may in retrospect appear now to be happening elsewhere, in Western Europe, North America, China and other places too (including in the extraterritorial land of Cyberspace)..
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Comment below to any of this, if you wish, or write privately to:

conductive.world@gmail.com

___________________________
*  Surely no reference needed! But just in case:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TU7JjJJZi1Q

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