Wednesday, 2 May 2012

INCHING INTO THE ACADEMIC MAINSTREAM

Another step forward in Israel

Starting last month Rony Schenker of Tsad Kadima is delivering a one-semester lecture course on Conductive Education and Cerebral Palsy within a taught masterate at the School of Education of Bar Ilan University, following a request from Prof. Heftsiba Lifhits.

I do not know of a similar arrangement anywhere else in the world since the nineteen-fifties, though I am sure that those who know better will be rushing to correct me and offer details.
This bit is particularly nice –
Conductive Education is a breakthrough and a new paradigm for the treatment and welfare of people with disability...The starting point of this approach is the understanding that motor disabilities … are a pedagogical rather than medical problem. 
Such a pity pity that one sees this sort of thing so rarely in English. And how nice to see it exercised and followed through in an 'outside' academic context.

5 comments:

  1. Just asking ... if, as I agree it is, the starting point of CE "is the understanding that motor disabilities ... are a pedagogical rather than a medical problem", in what pedagogical sense are the terms "treatment" and "welfare" used in "CE is ... a new paradigm for the treatment and welfare of people with disability"?

    Are we not confusing pedagogical and medical lexicons here? Should it not be "a new paradigm for the education and upbringing of people with disability"?

    As I say, just asking.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Norman

    I have to caution that this is a translation from Hebrew. I do not know the literal meaning of the original words and, not having a big Hebrew dictionary handy, I (lazily) relied on Google Translate.

    I do, however, know the sense since the original phrase was , I think, originally an English one that fitted more comfortably to the English-language distinction that you rightly emphasise.

    Would that translation were so simple! Gill Maguire have been struggling to find a satisfactory way of rendering into English the Hungarian verb kezelni used in the context of András Pető's early work in movement therapy as it transformed into movement pedagogy. 'Handle'? 'Treat'? 'Manage'? 'Deal with'? And how to describe those who did this job? 'Kezelönök'? Certainly not 'conductors'. Handling ladies'? ('Not hand maidens anyway'!)

    In the end we were defeated and had to resort to explanation.

    To find out more, hang just a little bit longer, and buy the book.

    And by the way, we still have a couple of weeks or so before we go to press. Any bright ideas on English ways for saying kezelni, kezelönök, without offending Norman's distinction, would be most gratefully received

    Andrew.

    ReplyDelete
  3. "...András Pető's early work in movement therapy as it transformed into movement pedagogy ..." a few words that encapsulates the wonderful journey undertaken by the great man himself: of enquiry, understanding and practice; an evolving breakthrough, that continued, no doubt, with Dr Hari and continues now but how and where?

    Meanwhile, from contacts with mainstream health and education professionals as well as the general population (such as media and marketing people), including many parents, I would say most are still at the 'movement therapy' stage of understanding and practice.

    Whatever else, we have a continuing duty of explanation and demonstration of conductive pedagogy: perhaps most importantly to the young, newly qualified conductors.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Actually, Norman, the 'journey' proved a very quick one, the qualitative leap having been made within a space of some three or four years at most, back at the end of the nineteen-forties.

    Once through that it remained for AP and his successors (not of course, over the last twenty or so years, just those working in Hungary) to explore the possibilities open to them under the new paradigm.

    I am afraid that one of those possibilities is to fall back out...

    ReplyDelete
  5. Treatment in this context means service provision. I accept Norman's 'education' addition, however, there is no word in Hebrew to reflect the meaning of 'upbringing'

    ReplyDelete