Wednesday, 13 May 2015

PHYSIOS

Doing it

I think that I can just about remember giving a short telephone interview to reporter Louise Hunt eleven or so years ago, on which the following brief news report was based –
Physios' conduct called into question
Patient care is suffering because physiotherapists are using Conductive Education without really understanding it, an expert has warned.
The Conductive Education rehabilitation method is based on the theory that patients with motor disorders can learn how to function independently, rather than rely on physical or medical intervention. Physios sometimes use it to rehabilitate patients with cerebral palsy, stroke and MS.
However, 'too many' PTs are using parts of the theory alongside conventional physio techniques without understanding it, said Andrew Sutton, director of the Foundation for Conductive Education.
In his view, the treatment must be taught as a complete philosophy, otherwise patients are unlikely to benefit fully and may be left disappointed.
Mr Sutton said: 'Basic training is not going to teach the fundamental theory at the centre of conductive education. We are trying to establish standards in a new field. If physios want to use this method then they should become qualified conductors...'
http://web.archive.org/web/20051109144105/http://www.therapyweekly.co.uk/nav?page=therapy.news.story&resource=643522

I do not, however, recall what had prompted Louise Hunt's phoning me, nor why our conversation took that particular turn.

It was a long time ago. Maybe this does not apply any more.

Reference

Hunt, L. (2003) Physios' conduct called into question, Therapy Weekly, 12 December

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