Thursday, 12 May 2016

LUXEMBOURG – RESULT

And a model for others

From Luxembourg, Schrëtt fir Schrëtt links to the official outcome of the debate of the Parliamentary education committee –
Revision of the law on private education
In search of a solution, MPs and the Minister have therefore agreed on a two-step procedure. In the short term, the Association continues to operate without change of status and retaining public funding of up to 80%. Subsequently, an external educational assessment and discussions with members of the Association are expected to come to a medium-term solution. Several ways were discussed: either the Pető method could be integrated into the [system of] differentiated education, a new institute could be established [and] a collaboration could be defined between the two.

In parallel, a revision of the law on private education is being considered. Reform should be accompanied by broader reflection on the funding of private schools, on the control and the criteria for access, as well as a possible opening up the field of children with special needs.

In parallel, a revision of the law on private education is being considered. Reform should be accompanied by broader reflection on the funding of private schools, on the control and the criteria for access, as well as a possible opening up the field of children with special needs.


What to make of this?

As Mao Tsetung (allegedly) said about the implications of the French revolution, it is too early to tell. 

So, is this Luxembourg result...
  • an official fudge or a famous victory, or
  • the beginning of the end, or the end of the beginning for the struggles of CE in Luxembourg?
Either way the next stage should be be very interesting for CE people around the world: an 'external educational assessment'. And the parallel stage might have wider beneficial implications for other groups of children in Luxembourg. In both cases, this will depend upon how others use it.

In Luxembourg Conductive Education has taken on its state educational system head on, and achieved a result, perhaps for the wider benefit of disabled children their families and future special-educational provision as a whole. It is now up to those outside Luxembourg to see how what happens there now can be utilised for their own benefit.

Read, note, mark, and inwardly digest.

Who dares, wins.

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1 comment:

  1. By coincidence, Facebook has just written to tell me of postings made on 12 May in earlier years.

    These include reports two Parliamentary occasions, one in the United Kingdom and the other in Canada.

    If there is anything to be learned by comparing these with what has happened in Luxembourg, it is that Parliamentary talk is not enough unless it is further worked on to maintain momentum for real change – if it is indeed to bring about a substantive new beginning.

    https://www.facebook.com/onthisday/?source=notification&notif_t=onthisday&notif_id=1462848183274585

    ReplyDelete